Apostle Islands Lighthouses

Historical Sites in Wisconsin

For more than a century, lighthouses have guided navigators through the waters of Lake Superior and the Apostle Islands. Today, these historic lighthouses are a traveler's treasure. Many of these majestic structures are still standing as monuments to Wisconsin's rich maritime history.

Sand Island Lighthouse

Considered by many to be one of the most beautiful lighthouses built on the Great Lakes, Sand Island Lighthouse was occupied for a shorter period of time than any of the other lighthouses in the archipelago. Built in 1881, Sand Island was one of the first lighthouses to be automated in 1921. The 44-foot tower and gothic-style lighthouse were built from locally quarried brownstone. Excursion boats visit the island daily mid-June through Labor Day, with tours of the lighthouse provided by national park volunteers.

La Pointe Lighthouse

Built in 1895, this 67' tall light is located on Long Island, one of the Apostle Islands just south of Madeline Island. The lighthouse can be viewed from special boat cruises. Not open for tours.

Michigan Island Lighthouse

The original lighthouse was constructed in 1857 and still stands today. In 1929, a 112' tower was added to the station. The island has a dock and is accessible by boat. Special cruises offer views of the station. National Park volunteers offer guided tours of the station daily. Located on the south end of Michigan Island.

Outer Island Lighthouse

Located on the northeastern tip of Outer Island this 90’ tower was built in 1874. The island has a dock and is accessible by boat. Special cruises offer views of the station. The lighthouse is closed to the public.

Raspberry Island Lighthouse

Built as the "Showplace of the Apostle Islands" to help mark the entrance to the new port of Bayfield, the Raspberry Island Lighthouse was lit in July of 1863. During its days of service, the majestic red and white Civil War-era lighthouse was well known for its beautiful flower gardens, which were cared for by the keepers' families. The final family left when the station was automated in 1947. Excursion boats visit the island daily from mid-June through Labor Day, with tours of the lighthouse provided by national park rangers. Visitors can get a close-up look at the lighthouse's original lens at the Wisconsin State Historical Society on Madeline Island.

Devils Island Lighthouse

The final jewel in the Apostle Islands' necklace of lights was added in 1891, with construction of Devil's Island Lighthouse. The 82-foot tower and two Queen Anne-style keepers' dwellings can be viewed May through September. Devil's Island has a dock at its south end and a rock landing near the lighthouse, which is accessible by boats in calm weather.

This entry was posted in Architecture, Tours, History & Heritage, Tours and tagged Features and Profiles, Destinations